Monday, July 28, 2014

An Nation of Liars

Hi, I am a T.V. producer...might I add your hair looks beautiful...Excuse me, I think I have a case of the stomach flu...
Everybody tells a little white lie now and then, but some do it without regard for anyone but themselves.

Some do it to keep that deep, dark secret from being exposed, or just to escape a sticky predicament. “People have always been willing to lie as well as die for what they believe is a good cause” (Dunn). A 1998 study concluded that “one out of four people told untruths in a startling one out of four conversations” (Knadler 170). With statistics like that, it is possible to deduce that we are being lied to, 25% of the time, and the only defense mechanism that we posses is to be aware of getting snowballed.

Liars have to rely on you, otherwise they have no one to listen to their stories. Once liars repeat their story enough times, eventually they will believe that it happened to them. Then when they tell someone else, they will receive the emotional response that they were searching for—through manipulation. Along with this, they activate a new self esteem and power (Monson). Most liars have a difficult time getting help, because they have to face their tale to bring themselves to reality. “For these people, reality is reflexively rearranged into dirty packages of deceit” (Monson). Psychiatrists now believe that liars suffer from a personality disorder that guides them to constantly speak lies, too, follow through with them(Monson).

Compulsive liars want to make their lives over like a storybook, and are successful in this feat by conjuring up a tall tale that an individual will believe. For instance, Monson affirms this by giving an example about Laura Belcher, who fell in love with a compulsive liar. She was unaware that she was a victim falling into his reality, and the truth came when her mother read that they arrested her daughter’s boyfriend for simulating an officer of the law. Some further digging into his history revealed a completely different image of him that Laura had never seen. Many liars think that “if they do not measure up to someone’s perceived standard, they use their imagination to elevate their stature” (Monson).

How can one spot a liar?

One strategy for being aware of liars involves verbal cues, which involve “tone and word choice in a conversation” (Knadler). Many times, perjurers are to busy selling you their tale they neglect thinking about important things that make the story more believable: “sentence structure, verb tense, and chronology” (Knadler). They also tend to abstract from the details. Knadler explains that “most people don’t think to include irrelevant trivia when selling an artificial explanation” (172). Another clue that can aid in helping you steer away from getting lied to is watching the liar’s body language, because they may be clicking a pen at a bionic rate, picking at imaginary sweater lint, or gradually backing toward an exit—broadcasting their deceitfulness (170). Their anxiety causes them to behave in this way, since their is the fear of being trapped in a lie and deceiving someone through their manipulation.

Career liars (professionals like salespeople, lawyers, Presidents) still lie to gain acceptance or approval, but they do it for power and to make money (170). They have smooth moves that are difficult to detect, and seem to have an answer for everything that tips of their confidence (170). For instance, salespeople, like to get comfortable, because they will speak to you on a first name basis like old friends. “How on earth could you doubt your best friend?” (Knadler 172). Another study suggests that it is much easier to victimize people when the liar dresses like the victim. They will also repeat your language, say they have the same interests and mimic your body gestures just to get close enough to pull a fast one on you.

People will continue to spin these phony fables as long as long as they have a listener, because research shows that “people want to believe what they are told, even if it is an outlandish lie” (Monson). Lies are painful and deceitful when done in the most serene convincing voice, and are just addicting as any legal or illegal substance.


Works Cited

  • Knadler Jessie. “How to Spot a Liar Anywhere.” Cosmopolitan Nov. 1998: 170+.
  • Monson, Gordon. "Liar!” Orlando Sentinel 21 January 1993: E1+. Mental Health. Ed. Eleanor Goldstein. Vol. 4. SIRS, 1994. Art. 82.

Why I Like Ceramic Cookware


My kitchen is buzzing with activity, and the smell of a delicious dinner fills the air. The oven is heating up a made-from-scratch casserole, and all four burners on the stove are being used to boil and steam a variety of mouth-watering foods. The microwave just dinged, signaling the end of a quick reheat, and the refrigerator is housing a potato salad made from a recipe handed down from generation to generation.  What is the one thing that all of this delicious food has in common? Regardless of the cooking style, all of this food will be prepared perfectly because it has been cooked in the best ceramic cookware on the market.

When it is time to bring the food to the table, the pots and pans that cooked the food easily convert to serving dishes and come right to the table. This takes the hassle out of transferring all of the freshly cooked food into serving dishes, and doubling the amount of dishes you have to wash after your meal. People who are serious about their food know ceramic is the best option when buying cookware.

High quality cookware is something that people intend to have around for a while, which is why ceramic is such a great option. Ceramic cookware is non-toxic – unlike Teflon, which is used in most of the best nonstick cookware on the market – and stain resistant, and it maintains its beauty and design through many years of family dinners. 

Ceramic cookware can help you cook healthier meals. Since the surface of a ceramic pot or pan is non-stick, you don’t have to resort to using butter to keep food from sticking to the pan. Ceramic cookware does not hold onto bacteria or tastes from previously cooked meals. This popular style of cookware does not interfere with the chemical structure of food. Another benefit of ceramic cookware is that is considered non-reactive, which means it will not react to foods with acidic ingredients. You don’t have to worry about a funny metallic taste when cooking with foods that are high in acidity like lemons or tomatoes.  Have you ever wondered why high quality cooks use pizza stones when making their famous pies? Ceramic materials pull moisture away from the dough, adding the crispness to the crust that everyone enjoys. It also holds heats very well, allowing for an all over even bake.

Not only is cooking a breeze with this high quality cookware, but cleaning up is easy too. Ceramic cookware is one of the easiest styles to clean, and won’t scratch or pit after a few good uses. 

The list of “pros” when it comes to using ceramic cookware is extensive: Easy to clean, versatile for many different cooking styles, converts easily to serving dishes and is non-toxic. However, none of this matters if the pot or pan is dropped. Anyone who has taken a pottery class knows that anything ceramic is unforgivable if dropped. These beautiful and multi-purpose dishes chip easily, and will shatter if dropped from a high enough point. These dishes require gentle care when being stacked or transported.

Before you get home with your fancy new cookware, you first must pace the cookware aisle of your favorite store and make the big purchase. Just as with any other major household purchase, you get what you pay for. Cookware, like beds and TVS, are used daily and are worth spending the money to ensure the highest quality possible. In other words, buy the best ceramic cookware you can afford. A quick online search can bring up thousands of choices, ranging from $50 to $500. You get what you pay for, and because cookware is a tool you will use daily, it is important to focus on quality. It is not always necessary to buy the entire set of cookware. Buying pots and pans by the piece can be a good way to build your cookware collection without shelling out a lot of money all at once.

Dinnertime is family time, and family time is precious. The time you spend cooking and eating together should be a fun and memorable experience. Don’t waste this time worrying about if the Teflon on your pan is flaking off into your shrimp scampi or if the kids are going to complain that the lemon sauce tastes like metal. Cook, serve, and eat in confidence knowing that you made the best decision for the health and appetite of your family by cooking their meals with high quality ceramic cookware.

Photo credit: photosteve101 from flickr